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Whirl Mini Mouse w/Comfort Pivot Review: A Mouse to Fight Carpal Tunnel

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The Whirl Mini Laser Mouse with Anti-gravity Comfort Pivot comes from Smartfish. What sets this mouse apart from others is the ergonomic design. It is raised on a stand that is attached to the bottom of the laser mouse with a ball pivot. This allows the user to rotate their hand at any angle that makes them comfortable. The result is less stress on the joints so users will avoid repetitive stress disorders like carpal tunnel syndrome.

The mouse is small enough that it will fit nicely into a computer bag accessory pocket. But unless you have really large hands, it should be large enough to be comfortable. There is a larger version meant to be kept at a desktop which we previously reviewed.

Video review of the Whirl Mini Laser Mouse:

What we really like about the Whirl Mini Mouse is the unique design. While we don’t have too much trouble with a receptive stress injury, we could see how this mouse could help. Being able to angle the hand is a bonus, and because of the ambidextrous design lefties will be satisfied with the mouse as well.

The USB receiver fits nicely into the compartment on the bottom of the mouse. It is easy to get open so as to take out the receiver and plug into a laptop. There is a power switch on the bottom to save the batteries when not in use. It takes two AAA batteries which are provided.

The nice red color is attractive. There are six different colors, as you can see to the right.

There isn’t any software to install or configure which makes it simple to use.

The only thing we didn’t like was getting used to the mouse pivoting as we clicked using the right, left or scroll wheel. And we have a personal preference for smooth scrolling wheels instead fo the scrolling wheels that click. We anticipate that the pivoting would be somethign that users will adjust to and the scrolling is more of a preference than a real shortcoming of the Whirl Laser Mouse.

Pros:

  • Ergonomic for avoiding stress injuries
  • Small enough for a computer bag
  • Looks nice
  • USB receiver hides in bottom of the mouse
  • Power switch saves battery

Cons:

  • Takes getting used to the mouse pivots
  • Would prefer option of a smooth scroll wheel

Kevin loves notebooks, tablets, gadgets and photography. He grew up with computers starting out on a Vic 20 and Commodore 64. The first computer he owned himself was an 8086 Compaq Deskpro. His foray into tablet computing began when he bought a Samsung Q1 Ultra. The smartphone market opened up for him with his Palm Treo 600.

3 Comments

  1. Natisha Leban

    May 20, 2011 at 2:43 pm

    I can not stop studying this.It really is so nice, so full of information that i just didn’t know.I am lucky to view that visitors are actually speaking about this drawback in this type of a intelligent strategy, displaying us all many different. You’re one great blogger. Please preserve it up. I can’t wait to undergo what’s next.

  2. 3d design

    August 16, 2011 at 12:45 am

    I’ve been using a laptop sleeve and laptop bag from Waterfield Designs for five years.
    Thank you very much for sharing

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