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Apple, TV and Mobile Are The Next Big Target for Hackers, Trojans and Viruses

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Traditionally Apple users have had fewer security issues than their Windows counterparts, but security firm McAfee warns that it’s only a matter of time before malicious users turn their attention to Mac as it is gaining users and a place in the business world. Apple isn’t alone as a new target for the underbelly of the web as McAfee also expects to see increased attacks on your TV and Mobile devices — with special attention being paid to your information.

In a release naming the top list of emerging targets in 2011,. Vincent Weafer, senior vice president of McAfee Laps warns, “We’ve seen significant advancements in device and social network adoption, placing a bulls-eye on the platforms and services users are embracing the most,” adding,”These platforms and services have become very popular in a short amount of time, and we’re already seeing a significant increase in vulnerabilities, attacks and data loss.”

The threat to Apple users stems from an increase in user base and newfound presence in corporations which were traditionally focused on Windows machines and handhelds. With a larger base to attack and high potential for reward or disruption of business, consumers may find that their iPhone, iPad or MacBook is the subject of a virus threat in 2011. We’ve already seen the potential for phishing attacks on the iPhone which could steal your bank account info or corporate login.

It is also expected that cyber criminals will use services like Foursquare and URL shorteners to send hidden malicious links and to gain a wealth of knowledge about where you go which can be used to craft specialized attacks that are more believable. These same criminals may also target your Internet connected TV to harvest personal information.

With the possibility of new attacks in 2011 be sure to stay vigilant. If your system can be equipped with a virus program we recommend using one and using common sense when you receive an email asking for information or when your computer asks you to install a program you aren’t familiar with.

Josh Smith is a longtime mobile tech user, currently using a Droid as his primary smartphone. Josh is also an editor at Notebooks.com where he reviews notebooks and other mobile tech. Follow Josh on Twitter @Josh_Smith or email him Josh@Notebooks.com.

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