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MacBook Pro Review: Why I’m Done With Netbooks

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When I told my wife I was going to sell every computer I own and purchase a Apple MacBook Pro so that I could simplify my life, I thought she’d say no.  She didn’t.  We both agreed that 6 computers in the house was verging on obsessive.

I have owned and been disappointed with several netbooks since the craze began with the storied Eee PC 701.  My arsenal of frustration has included the original Eee PC 701, an MSI Wind U100, the Eee PC 1000HA, and the Eee PC 1000HE.  Sure, they performed exactly as described with the exception of not meeting their stated battery life, but the limitations of being a netbook made them difficult to use.  After trying to find peace with the perfect netbook, I kept finding the keyboards too cramped, screens too small, and the Atom processor too weak.

Comparing a netbook to a notebook such as the MacBook Pro is like comparing a Geo Tracker and a Hummer; they’re in two completely different categories.  Unfortunately, I had succumbed to the myth that a netbook could meet my basic computing tasks while a home-based and more powerful computer would accomplish my intensive computing requirements.

I gathered together the computers I had in my house which included a few dead clunkers in the garage, an older Motion M1300 Tablet PC, an HP desktop running Windows XP circa 2001, an Eee PC 1000HE, and a 1.83 Ghz Intel Core Duo MacBook, and hit up craigslist and eBay to liquidate.  I had the necessary funds available after about two weeks of auctions and sales.  It was clear that I wanted a computer with plenty of power and long battery life.  I was seeking a notebook that would replace the need for both a netbook and a more powerful desktop.

The Decision Process:
I had been a PC guy until about four years ago.  I purchased my first iBook G4 on eBay, got hooked on OS X, and was slowly weaned from Windows XP/Vista.  Apple’s transition to Intel processors sealed the deal for my conversion as it gave me the flexibility to run both OS X and any version of Windows.  The Mac suddenly became a machine of great design and function.  A CNN Money article by Andy Serwer titled, “Best advice: Gates on Gates,” features several great questions in an interview session with Bill Gates Jr. and Sr.  In one of the questions, Bill was asked what he learned from Steve Jobs over the years.  He answered that Steve’s focus has been different than that of Bill and Microsoft; Steve has focused on user interface and design.  These are the two things that heavily swayed me into the Mac world.

I sought the MacBook Pro largely because of its reputation as a top of the line machine with plenty of power and upgrade options.  The new MBP’s support large hard drives of up to 500 GB, up to 8 GB of RAM, 802.11n wireless, FireWire 800, the NVIDIA GeForce 9400M integrated graphics processor, an integrated SD slot, and a battery that’s stated to last up to 5 years or 1,000 charge cycles.  The MacBook Pro’s unibody, aluminum case make it attractive and durable, a notebook that meets both style and purpose.

The MacBook Pro will be overkill if you only need a notebook for simple, Internet-based tasks, but I wanted a machine that will still be viable after owning it for a few years.  Unlike a netbook or budget notebook that is outdated six months after its purchase, the MacBook Pro will retain its value and provide the necessary power to meet all of my computing needs.

What I purchased:
I qualified for Apple’s student discount since I was pursuing coursework beyond my Master’s at the local university.  I decided on and purchased a 2.26 Ghz, 13 inch MacBook Pro with 2 GB RAM from the Apple Store.   Included in the student discount deal, I received a second generation iPod Touch 8GB for free (after rebate).  The MacBook Pro’s grand total was $1099 (originally $1199) after discount.

Traditionally, I have purchased all of my Apple notebooks through the refurbished Apple Store.  Buying refurbished products is one of the best kept secrets when it comes to buying notebooks as they usually come with the standard warranty, new parts, accessories, and cost much less.  I had purchased my two previous MacBooks as refurbished models and saved around $250 on each one.  I investigated the refurbished Apple Store and found that they had a 13 inch unibody MacBook (not MacBook Pro) for $949, but the MacBook Pro with free iPod Touch student discount was clearly the better deal.

Apple MacBook Pro Specs:

  • 13 inch, Aluminum Unibody
  • 160 GB Serial ATA Drive @ 5400 rpm
  • Backlit keyboard
  • Superdrive 8x (DVDRW/CDRW)
  • 2 GB 1066MHz DDR3 SDRAM
  • 2.26 GHz Intel Core Duo 2
  • Accessory Kit & Software

Design:
The 13 inch MacBook Pro is similar in dimension, weight, and outward appearance as my white MacBook.  The MBP’s unibody design gives it a more solid feel than the plastic of the white MacBook.  I had no complaints with the feel of the white MacBook, but I can certainly tell a difference after handling and typing on the MBP.

The MBP’s LED screen appears crisper and brighter than the white MacBook.  Both computers have the glossy screen, which I prefer, but the colors seem more vivid on the MBP.  The black frame on the MBP’s screen seems to draw the eyes inward, drawing attention to whatever image or movie is being displayed.  Both computers are set to a resolution of 1280×800.

img_3726One item that is causing a small learning curve is the ginormous trackpad.  This generation of MacBook Pros has done away with the trackpad button and replaced it with a large, clickable trackpad.  To select an item you simply push down on the trackpad where you’d expect the button to be located.  This larger trackpad allows for multitouch finger input, three finger swipes, pinching, and rotating gestures that are similar to the iPhone.  My problem is that I keep dragging my thumb on the trackpad and interfering with the two-finger scrolling.  This is a pretty small issue that’s easily remedied.

The backlit keyboard isn’t a necessity, but it sure does look cool.  It has come in handy a few times when I wanted to check something quickly in a dark room.  Even the lowest setting provides enough light to easily see the keys.  This feature is the one that makes people “ooh and awe” the most.  The keyboard is firm with no flex.  It is very similar to the white MacBook but feels much more solid.  Some may find the MBP keyboard too stiff at first.

As many know, some plastic MacBook’s have suffered from hairline cracks around the palmrest after a few years of use.  Both of my white MacBooks, the 1.83 Core Duo and the 2.1 Core Duo 2, suffered from small cracks where the lid meets the palmrest.  I am always meticulous with my notebooks, never slamming the screen closed or abusing them.  I called Apple Care to see if they would assist although both were out of warranty.  The customer support folks that I spoke with were very helpful as they consulted their database and determined the cracking was a defect.  Both computers were fixed at Apple’s expense, no cost to me.  This level of service helped me decide to stick with Apple and purchase the MacBook Pro.

Battery Life:
Battery life was never an issue on my white MacBook.  I could easily get 3.5+ hours on a full charge.  The 13 inch MBP is advertised to achieve 7 hours on a full charge with its revolutionary battery technology, although I haven’t had that experience.  I have averaged a little over 5 hours which is still very respectable considering I’m surfing, watching videos, and occasionally listening to music.  It would be entirely possible to get over 6 hours with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth off and the screen dimmed.

Software:
Apple’s Migration Assistant software that easily transfers your desired data to a new Mac works flawlessly. picture-1 To be honest, I have never been as satisfied with a program that works so easy.  All of my documents, music, photos, and applications were successfully transferred to my new MacBook Pro after following a few simple prompts.  My main concern was transferring over 3,000 digital photos from my personal album.  The migration assistant set up my new computer exactly as my old one had been; sitting down at my new computer was just like waking it up from standby.  Impressive.

To all those about to jump on the netbook bandwagon, I say wait.  Netbooks are great mobile companions, but they are still underpowered and too small.  It may have once been true that after six months a new computer becomes obsolete, but that process has slowed significantly.  Computers manufactured in 2003 are still fully usable and in use at the public school where I work.  I have family members that are able to have a full Internet experience with older PCs.  However, the rate at which netbooks are becoming obsolete is much faster than traditional notebooks on the market.  Monthly, new netbooks are being introduced with larger screens, better keyboards, more memory, better graphics, and cheaper prices.  The line is beginning to blur between notebooks and netbooks.  Understand that if you buy a new netbook today it will be outdated tomorrow.

Additional Photos:

img_3723

MacBook Pro on top of white MacBook

img_3724

Side comparison with MacBook Pro packaging in background.

White MacBook beside 13" MacBook Pro

White MacBook beside 13" MacBook Pro

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116 Comments

  1. Steve (StevesMacFIx

    July 19, 2009 at 12:25 am

    This is an excellent review! Your writing skills are excellent! I am very impressed! I love the analogy of the “Geo Tracker”, and a “Hummer”. Well thought out review, very detail oriented, great examples, awesome photos, and comparisons. Overall, a well thought out review! Thank you for sharing!

    • Mark

      July 20, 2009 at 4:55 am

      i agree great article, the only thing you left out is one of my favorite features that is the 4 finger swipes amazing computer i bought one my self a month ago

  2. Steve (StevesMacFIx

    July 18, 2009 at 5:25 pm

    This is an excellent review! Your writing skills are excellent! I am very impressed! I love the analogy of the “Geo Tracker”, and a “Hummer”. Well thought out review, very detail oriented, great examples, awesome photos, and comparisons. Overall, a well thought out review! Thank you for sharing!

    • Mark

      July 19, 2009 at 9:55 pm

      i agree great article, the only thing you left out is one of my favorite features that is the 4 finger swipes amazing computer i bought one my self a month ago

  3. Constable Odo

    July 19, 2009 at 3:14 am

    I really don’t understand why people think buying a netbook is moving forward when in reality it is a huge step backwards. OK, it might be good for certain things, but it’s such a small percentage of what a real (read powerful) notebook can do. OK, the netbook is also smaller, lighter and cheaper, but that’s only really useful if you have multiple computers. Otherwise you’re going to have a single weak computer that you can’t do the other 80% of things you should be able to do.

    Before netbooks everyone was probably using at least a dual-core 1.83 to 2.1 GHz chip in their notebooks and then all of a sudden they’re happy with some 1.6 GHz Atom. Give me a break. I see a netbook as a disposable computer or maybe a usable computer for BRIC nations, but surely not for people in the U.S. or Europe. Asus should have been selling those things to their own people in China. Netbooks are definitely growing every couple of months and soon they’ll be the equivalent size of notebooks with less processing power and still running desktop Windows. Suckers.

    I’ve been using a 2.33 GHz 15″ MacBook Pro for a couple of years and I don’t want anything less than that. No way I’m going to touch a netbook. Those things are just plain weak. Next MacBook Pro I want should be at least a dual-core 2.8 GHz job.

  4. Constable Odo

    July 18, 2009 at 8:14 pm

    I really don’t understand why people think buying a netbook is moving forward when in reality it is a huge step backwards. OK, it might be good for certain things, but it’s such a small percentage of what a real (read powerful) notebook can do. OK, the netbook is also smaller, lighter and cheaper, but that’s only really useful if you have multiple computers. Otherwise you’re going to have a single weak computer that you can’t do the other 80% of things you should be able to do.

    Before netbooks everyone was probably using at least a dual-core 1.83 to 2.1 GHz chip in their notebooks and then all of a sudden they’re happy with some 1.6 GHz Atom. Give me a break. I see a netbook as a disposable computer or maybe a usable computer for BRIC nations, but surely not for people in the U.S. or Europe. Asus should have been selling those things to their own people in China. Netbooks are definitely growing every couple of months and soon they’ll be the equivalent size of notebooks with less processing power and still running desktop Windows. Suckers.

    I’ve been using a 2.33 GHz 15″ MacBook Pro for a couple of years and I don’t want anything less than that. No way I’m going to touch a netbook. Those things are just plain weak. Next MacBook Pro I want should be at least a dual-core 2.8 GHz job.

  5. Jocca

    July 19, 2009 at 3:26 am

    I have been using my unibody 15″ since November and have gotten so used to the multi-touch pad that I can safely say that the days of the mouse are numbered. I am not stating this lightly but after I had to use a mouse recently on my desktop (been very much neglected after the acquisition of this MBP), I simply found the process to be so much less natural, so much more tedious that I came to this sad conclusion that Apple new models is going to start another shift in our way of using the computers again.

  6. Jocca

    July 18, 2009 at 8:26 pm

    I have been using my unibody 15″ since November and have gotten so used to the multi-touch pad that I can safely say that the days of the mouse are numbered. I am not stating this lightly but after I had to use a mouse recently on my desktop (been very much neglected after the acquisition of this MBP), I simply found the process to be so much less natural, so much more tedious that I came to this sad conclusion that Apple new models is going to start another shift in our way of using the computers again.

  7. Dave

    July 19, 2009 at 5:07 am

    I could never do a netbook as my primary. I “switched” from my first Mac (an SE/30) to the PB 150 and soon fell in love with the PB Duo (I owned three!) with its Desktop module with full keyboard and CRT options. I cannot even remember the total number of Mac laptops I have owned.

    Fortunately I now have a job that allows me to delegate my old laptops to others as I keep my own up-to-date with the latest and greatest. I upgrade about once per year.

    My new MacBook Pro 15″ 3.06 GHz 500GB 7200 rpm drive with 4GB of memory is, without a doubt, the best laptop on the market today. Once you feel the solid unibody construction you will never want to own a flimsy laptop again. My next system will likely have an SSD, but the small size and high cost of these today is hard to justify.

    I will very likely buy the new tablet as soon as it s released, so I can test it for various potential applications for my company.

  8. Dave

    July 18, 2009 at 10:07 pm

    I could never do a netbook as my primary. I “switched” from my first Mac (an SE/30) to the PB 150 and soon fell in love with the PB Duo (I owned three!) with its Desktop module with full keyboard and CRT options. I cannot even remember the total number of Mac laptops I have owned.

    Fortunately I now have a job that allows me to delegate my old laptops to others as I keep my own up-to-date with the latest and greatest. I upgrade about once per year.

    My new MacBook Pro 15″ 3.06 GHz 500GB 7200 rpm drive with 4GB of memory is, without a doubt, the best laptop on the market today. Once you feel the solid unibody construction you will never want to own a flimsy laptop again. My next system will likely have an SSD, but the small size and high cost of these today is hard to justify.

    I will very likely buy the new tablet as soon as it s released, so I can test it for various potential applications for my company.

  9. Dan

    July 19, 2009 at 10:20 am

    I am in IT and have used Notebooks as my primary machine for 14 years. I’ve never been able to get past that cramped keyboard when trying them out in the store. For personal use at home I just made the switch to the MacBook Pro in March. It is the best hardware I have ever used. As long as Apple continues in its current direction, I’ll buy their notebooks.

  10. Dan

    July 19, 2009 at 3:20 am

    I am in IT and have used Notebooks as my primary machine for 14 years. I’ve never been able to get past that cramped keyboard when trying them out in the store. For personal use at home I just made the switch to the MacBook Pro in March. It is the best hardware I have ever used. As long as Apple continues in its current direction, I’ll buy their notebooks.

  11. Queixa

    July 19, 2009 at 4:24 pm

    In defense of netbooks:

    I think a better analogy would have been a Smart Car or Mini to a Hummer. I think most people do not need the functionality of the Hummer most of the time. I got my netbook in January and have barely used my desktop since then. My desktop now serves primarily as long-term storage. I ditched the OEM OS on my netbook for Ubuntu.

    So occasionally I have to wait a few seconds while my netbook “thinks”. It does not have the power of a notebook or a desktop. But it is lighter, smaller, more convenient, and easier to take with me than your MacBook. And the difference in price is enough to pay for a weekend get-away for me to take my netbook on.

    And as for the netbook being obsolete faster: a. So what? It’s not like my netbook stopped working just because Asus released one with a larger screen. The idea behind the netbook is that you may not need the biggest, most powerful, most up-to-date computer; and b. Your MacBook is rapidly obsolete to those who want the biggest. Look at the other posts — My new MacBook is great. My next system will have… I’ll buy the Mac tablet as soon as it is released… (rumored to be October on a blog I read).

    In my past, I have been a graphic designer. Then I needed the most powerful computer and largest duo monitors I could get. Then I needed a “Hummer” computer. Now, like a lot of people, I use a computer for the Internet, e-mail, to load my iPod and download podcasts, and do some basic things with photos, keep track of my checkbook, read an e-book. Maybe write a letter, play a little game for a few minutes. The “Smart Car” computer handles all of this with no problem.

    If you really need the “Hummer” computer, then the netbook is definitely not the way to go. But if the “Smart Car” computer would handle what you do, the netbook is a great way to go.

    • TeasB

      July 20, 2009 at 1:57 pm

      Your Smart Car analogy is a good one but to me it still doesn’t justify a netbook with the cramped keyboard. It certainly justifies a slower computer but it does not justify a cramped keyboard. The keyboard to me is the biggest problem of the netbooks. Why would I want to risk personal injury from using a cramped keyboard?

      To me, this is where the MacBook Air comes in or any netbook that doesn’t have a cramped keyboard.

    • Scotty

      September 18, 2009 at 7:08 am

      Good call Queixa.

      I love Macs. I am awaiting shipment of a 13″ MacBook Pro as we speak.

      However, I also work in the software industry and I have a large family (all of whom use their computers for little more than surfing the web and uploading/viewing photos).

      At work, the ability of a Macbook Pro is wasted. We work with MS Office and Visual Studio.

      At home with my family, a netbook would easily suffice. Surfing the web and viewing images doesn’t require much power.

      However, I am a loyal Mac user because:

      It’s built on UNIX. I can take advantage of the great commands run from a terminal.

      Optimization for multimedia. Yeah, I work at a large corp., using Dells, but when I come home and I want to record my Fender American Deluxe Strat, my Macbook Pro does the job beautifully.

      Like any collision of opinion, it depends on the individual’s needs.

      And since Macs moved to Intel processors and easy Windows installations, a Macbook (pro) is an easy choice to have around for work as well as personal enjoyment.

  12. Queixa

    July 19, 2009 at 9:24 am

    In defense of netbooks:

    I think a better analogy would have been a Smart Car or Mini to a Hummer. I think most people do not need the functionality of the Hummer most of the time. I got my netbook in January and have barely used my desktop since then. My desktop now serves primarily as long-term storage. I ditched the OEM OS on my netbook for Ubuntu.

    So occasionally I have to wait a few seconds while my netbook “thinks”. It does not have the power of a notebook or a desktop. But it is lighter, smaller, more convenient, and easier to take with me than your MacBook. And the difference in price is enough to pay for a weekend get-away for me to take my netbook on.

    And as for the netbook being obsolete faster: a. So what? It’s not like my netbook stopped working just because Asus released one with a larger screen. The idea behind the netbook is that you may not need the biggest, most powerful, most up-to-date computer; and b. Your MacBook is rapidly obsolete to those who want the biggest. Look at the other posts — My new MacBook is great. My next system will have… I’ll buy the Mac tablet as soon as it is released… (rumored to be October on a blog I read).

    In my past, I have been a graphic designer. Then I needed the most powerful computer and largest duo monitors I could get. Then I needed a “Hummer” computer. Now, like a lot of people, I use a computer for the Internet, e-mail, to load my iPod and download podcasts, and do some basic things with photos, keep track of my checkbook, read an e-book. Maybe write a letter, play a little game for a few minutes. The “Smart Car” computer handles all of this with no problem.

    If you really need the “Hummer” computer, then the netbook is definitely not the way to go. But if the “Smart Car” computer would handle what you do, the netbook is a great way to go.

    • TeasB

      July 20, 2009 at 6:57 am

      Your Smart Car analogy is a good one but to me it still doesn’t justify a netbook with the cramped keyboard. It certainly justifies a slower computer but it does not justify a cramped keyboard. The keyboard to me is the biggest problem of the netbooks. Why would I want to risk personal injury from using a cramped keyboard?

      To me, this is where the MacBook Air comes in or any netbook that doesn’t have a cramped keyboard.

    • Scotty

      September 18, 2009 at 12:08 am

      Good call Queixa.

      I love Macs. I am awaiting shipment of a 13″ MacBook Pro as we speak.

      However, I also work in the software industry and I have a large family (all of whom use their computers for little more than surfing the web and uploading/viewing photos).

      At work, the ability of a Macbook Pro is wasted. We work with MS Office and Visual Studio.

      At home with my family, a netbook would easily suffice. Surfing the web and viewing images doesn’t require much power.

      However, I am a loyal Mac user because:

      It’s built on UNIX. I can take advantage of the great commands run from a terminal.

      Optimization for multimedia. Yeah, I work at a large corp., using Dells, but when I come home and I want to record my Fender American Deluxe Strat, my Macbook Pro does the job beautifully.

      Like any collision of opinion, it depends on the individual’s needs.

      And since Macs moved to Intel processors and easy Windows installations, a Macbook (pro) is an easy choice to have around for work as well as personal enjoyment.

  13. Yury

    July 19, 2009 at 7:35 pm

    I feel sorry for the author: with so many PCs (and a new Mac is a PC, face this!) he likely does not know what he needs a computer for. As a computer professional with +35 years of experience I have never had a doubt about all pieces of hardware I was buying. I am still running a PC circa 2001 under Windows/XP as my photo- and video-editing home computer (and latest versions of Ulead and Adobe work just fine on 4GB of storage and with a 500GB HDD). I also have a Lenovo notebook with the Santa-Rosa chipset (bought more than a year ago) under Vista Business, and have NEVER regretted keeping this system on th disk. Simply, I know what I need from this PC: connecting me to my company’s Intranet, photo-editing, word processing, VoIP (Skype) and a few other tasks. That’s it for today!

    And now I have started to think about a netbook which would help me on the road with Internet, VoIP over HSPA/3G and GPS – and I find smartphones (even with very large screens up to 4″) not ractical, because I like a real keyboard. Hopefully an ASUS PC T91 tablet with a multitouch screen and built-in GPS, slated for manufacturing in the fall with Windows 7 will be able to impress me even without HSPA/3G (after all I can use a 3G dongle).

    The most important thing about computers is this: you MUST know what you need them for! After that choosing a one becomes a not very complicated question of a long-lasting hardware and a right software, regardless of whether it is a Mac or Linux or Windows.

    • Yuryhater

      September 4, 2009 at 5:39 pm

      Being a computer professional for 35 years has obviously made you errogaont. What I can face is that the macs use intel processors and run on a posix based operating system. The public definition of a pc is a computer that runs on windows, which they don’t (unless you want them to, furthering their versatility). Apparently it took the author a while to figure out what he needed, does this really require some nasty criticism? You are much more ignorant than you realize if all you use is windows. Play the field a little and you might just learn that. BTW, no one gives a sh*t about the technical specs of everything you use nor what impresses you, as we came here to read about the new solidly built Macbook pro, regardless of the operating system of choice.

      • yury

        September 4, 2009 at 5:58 pm

        Apparently, the word “MAC” in the context which does not meet your criterias immediately triggers that particular sort of reaction … I am afraid you did not bother to read my whole post … and in the end of it I am saying exactly:

        =====

        The most important thing about computers is this: you MUST know what you need them for! After that choosing a one becomes a not very complicated question of a long-lasting hardware and a right software, regardless of whether it is a Mac or Linux or Windows.

        ======

        It all boils down to personal usability and the set of applications with NO REGARD to actual hardware … which is why I think you did not really read my post because it does NOT criticize MACs :-)

        P.S. … and please think twice the next time you will be going to write the word “arrogant”, this does not require 35+ years of experience for sure :-)

        • Yuryhater

          September 5, 2009 at 12:22 am

          I actually did read the whole post, which was written in an arrogant tone (even on second thought I can see this). You can criticize macs all you want, that is what a review is for. I didn’t comment on the phrase which you so kindly repeated because it was the only section I agreed with.

          What I don’t agree with is you criticizing so rudely and arrogantly the purchasing mistakes the author admittedly made, as if you haven’t made any in your 35+ years as a “professional” and then quoting your entire hardware inventory as if it were ideal. Didn’t you just stress the fact that hardware needs vary from person to person?

          From my perspective your hardware set-up sucks, should I feel sorry for you if someday you realize this?

    • Cereal Killer

      September 17, 2009 at 9:00 pm

      The only smart thing you have said in your whole comment was that you use Skype.

      Vista sucks. No matter what kinda computer you run it on, it just sucks.

      and the fact that you use Ulead is a dead give away that your not so “professional” as you claim to be.

      I give the editor props on getting the Mac, But like alot of post he seems to just be one of them guys that has more money than common since.

      I have got to say, if  releases a itablet with gps built in I am gonna jump in, but I am keeping an eye on the Viliv x70 which I am thinking about also.

      would like to have something with all the options gps,3g,wifi how ever it runs on XP… which is ok but I would much rather use .

      And the comment bellow “The public definition of a pc is a computer that runs on windows”

      this goes to show you just how smart 80% of end users are.

      A Pc is just that … a Personal Computer

      which can mean an ,Linux or god for bid a Windblows OS.

      and the day I have to “activate” my Osx Apple will be out the door. Done tested and used Ubuntu and it will some day be on a throw around netbook … being that my main source or transportation is a motorcycle …. throwing a $2500 laptop in my backpack is completely nutts.

      • Y2K Blackout

        October 7, 2009 at 3:47 am

        Vista doesn’t suck. I ran Vista Ultimate on my PC for years and it worked flawlessly. Don’t be an assclown! You don’t see me talking about how Mac users are idiots… oh wait.

        • Amaser

          November 12, 2009 at 7:58 pm

          hmmm. If Vista doesn’t suck, then why are Microsoft replacing it after barely 2 years….?

          win 95 – win 98 = 3 years

          win 98 – win me(september 00) = 3 years

          win me – win xp = 2 years (ME was very unstable)

          win xp – vista = 6 years

          vista – 7 = bout 18 months or so…

          They are trying to forget about Vista because it is CRAP!!!

          Al

  14. Yury

    July 19, 2009 at 12:35 pm

    I feel sorry for the author: with so many PCs (and a new Mac is a PC, face this!) he likely does not know what he needs a computer for. As a computer professional with +35 years of experience I have never had a doubt about all pieces of hardware I was buying. I am still running a PC circa 2001 under Windows/XP as my photo- and video-editing home computer (and latest versions of Ulead and Adobe work just fine on 4GB of storage and with a 500GB HDD). I also have a Lenovo notebook with the Santa-Rosa chipset (bought more than a year ago) under Vista Business, and have NEVER regretted keeping this system on th disk. Simply, I know what I need from this PC: connecting me to my company’s Intranet, photo-editing, word processing, VoIP (Skype) and a few other tasks. That’s it for today!

    And now I have started to think about a netbook which would help me on the road with Internet, VoIP over HSPA/3G and GPS – and I find smartphones (even with very large screens up to 4″) not ractical, because I like a real keyboard. Hopefully an ASUS PC T91 tablet with a multitouch screen and built-in GPS, slated for manufacturing in the fall with Windows 7 will be able to impress me even without HSPA/3G (after all I can use a 3G dongle).

    The most important thing about computers is this: you MUST know what you need them for! After that choosing a one becomes a not very complicated question of a long-lasting hardware and a right software, regardless of whether it is a Mac or Linux or Windows.

    • Yuryhater

      September 4, 2009 at 10:39 am

      Being a computer professional for 35 years has obviously made you errogaont. What I can face is that the macs use intel processors and run on a posix based operating system. The public definition of a pc is a computer that runs on windows, which they don’t (unless you want them to, furthering their versatility). Apparently it took the author a while to figure out what he needed, does this really require some nasty criticism? You are much more ignorant than you realize if all you use is windows. Play the field a little and you might just learn that. BTW, no one gives a sh*t about the technical specs of everything you use nor what impresses you, as we came here to read about the new solidly built Macbook pro, regardless of the operating system of choice.

      • yury

        September 4, 2009 at 10:58 am

        Apparently, the word “MAC” in the context which does not meet your criterias immediately triggers that particular sort of reaction … I am afraid you did not bother to read my whole post … and in the end of it I am saying exactly:

        =====

        The most important thing about computers is this: you MUST know what you need them for! After that choosing a one becomes a not very complicated question of a long-lasting hardware and a right software, regardless of whether it is a Mac or Linux or Windows.

        ======

        It all boils down to personal usability and the set of applications with NO REGARD to actual hardware … which is why I think you did not really read my post because it does NOT criticize MACs :-)

        P.S. … and please think twice the next time you will be going to write the word “arrogant”, this does not require 35+ years of experience for sure :-)

        • Yuryhater

          September 4, 2009 at 5:22 pm

          I actually did read the whole post, which was written in an arrogant tone (even on second thought I can see this). You can criticize macs all you want, that is what a review is for. I didn’t comment on the phrase which you so kindly repeated because it was the only section I agreed with.

          What I don’t agree with is you criticizing so rudely and arrogantly the purchasing mistakes the author admittedly made, as if you haven’t made any in your 35+ years as a “professional” and then quoting your entire hardware inventory as if it were ideal. Didn’t you just stress the fact that hardware needs vary from person to person?

          From my perspective your hardware set-up sucks, should I feel sorry for you if someday you realize this?

    • Cereal Killer

      September 17, 2009 at 2:00 pm

      The only smart thing you have said in your whole comment was that you use Skype.

      Vista sucks. No matter what kinda computer you run it on, it just sucks.

      and the fact that you use Ulead is a dead give away that your not so “professional” as you claim to be.

      I give the editor props on getting the Mac, But like alot of post he seems to just be one of them guys that has more money than common since.

      I have got to say, if  releases a itablet with gps built in I am gonna jump in, but I am keeping an eye on the Viliv x70 which I am thinking about also.

      would like to have something with all the options gps,3g,wifi how ever it runs on XP… which is ok but I would much rather use .

      And the comment bellow “The public definition of a pc is a computer that runs on windows”

      this goes to show you just how smart 80% of end users are.

      A Pc is just that … a Personal Computer

      which can mean an ,Linux or god for bid a Windblows OS.

      and the day I have to “activate” my Osx Apple will be out the door. Done tested and used Ubuntu and it will some day be on a throw around netbook … being that my main source or transportation is a motorcycle …. throwing a $2500 laptop in my backpack is completely nutts.

      • Y2K Blackout

        October 6, 2009 at 8:47 pm

        Vista doesn’t suck. I ran Vista Ultimate on my PC for years and it worked flawlessly. Don’t be an assclown! You don’t see me talking about how Mac users are idiots… oh wait.

        • Amaser

          November 12, 2009 at 12:58 pm

          hmmm. If Vista doesn’t suck, then why are Microsoft replacing it after barely 2 years….?

          win 95 – win 98 = 3 years

          win 98 – win me(september 00) = 3 years

          win me – win xp = 2 years (ME was very unstable)

          win xp – vista = 6 years

          vista – 7 = bout 18 months or so…

          They are trying to forget about Vista because it is CRAP!!!

          Al

  15. robinson

    July 19, 2009 at 9:16 pm

    Wonderful, nicely written, informative review. Photos were good, too, save for a few that were a bit blurry! :)

    I’m tempted by that same machine (I have an IPT, but could hand it off to my older brother who I know would really like it). My only reservation is that I’m using a 15″ laptop now and worry that going to 13″ is going to feel cramped. (I went from a 14″ to a 15″ which is great because I park the dock on the right side and can have wide open browser windows and still have 1-click access to the desktop.)

    I’ll need to look at one in person!

  16. robinson

    July 19, 2009 at 2:16 pm

    Wonderful, nicely written, informative review. Photos were good, too, save for a few that were a bit blurry! :)

    I’m tempted by that same machine (I have an IPT, but could hand it off to my older brother who I know would really like it). My only reservation is that I’m using a 15″ laptop now and worry that going to 13″ is going to feel cramped. (I went from a 14″ to a 15″ which is great because I park the dock on the right side and can have wide open browser windows and still have 1-click access to the desktop.)

    I’ll need to look at one in person!

  17. TeasB

    July 20, 2009 at 1:50 pm

    The most impractical element of a netbook is the cramped keyboard. I think any laptop/netbook that will be used for any serious work needs to have a normal sized keyboard. That means the smallest a practical computer can ever be is the size of a normal keyboard. Smaller than that and your fingers cramp up easily, not to mention prolonged use means damage to your own physical body. What a F-ing stupid idea!

    For those who want the portability of the netbook, this is where the MacBook Air comes in. It is really very light and portable but the keyboard is normal sized.

  18. TeasB

    July 20, 2009 at 6:50 am

    The most impractical element of a netbook is the cramped keyboard. I think any laptop/netbook that will be used for any serious work needs to have a normal sized keyboard. That means the smallest a practical computer can ever be is the size of a normal keyboard. Smaller than that and your fingers cramp up easily, not to mention prolonged use means damage to your own physical body. What a F-ing stupid idea!

    For those who want the portability of the netbook, this is where the MacBook Air comes in. It is really very light and portable but the keyboard is normal sized.

  19. Lenore

    July 22, 2009 at 1:45 am

    I’m a graphic designer that travels. Are there any designers in the audience who use the MBP? If so, how do you like it? Could I hook it up to a larger screen for use when I’m not traveling?

    • Xavier

      July 22, 2009 at 8:10 pm

      You can hook it up to external displays, though you’ll need an adapter for non-Apple displays. Apple makes some very nice external displays, but they are expensive.

      I believe VGA and DVI adapters cost about $25 each.

      • AussieDave

        July 23, 2009 at 4:04 am

        I’m an Aussie journalist who produces a daily newsletter using InDesign. At home I use a G5 Power mac with Apple Cinema display – as backup or when on the road I use the earlier white MacBook 13-inch; it’s kinda cramped, but quite useable on the road and Australian carrier Telstra’s near-universal “Next G” 3G service gives great wireless broadband access in most places. At home I plug in a large-screen display (22-inch LG widescreen – cost abt 250 Aussie bucks) to the MacBook via VGA/mini DVI adaptor and find it every bit as good as my G5 desktop setup. Recently had a loaner MacBook Pro 15-incher attached to the big screen – even better. With the 17-incher, possibly I’d have no need for the extra big screen.

  20. Lenore

    July 21, 2009 at 6:45 pm

    I’m a graphic designer that travels. Are there any designers in the audience who use the MBP? If so, how do you like it? Could I hook it up to a larger screen for use when I’m not traveling?

    • Xavier

      July 22, 2009 at 1:10 pm

      You can hook it up to external displays, though you’ll need an adapter for non-Apple displays. Apple makes some very nice external displays, but they are expensive.

      I believe VGA and DVI adapters cost about $25 each.

      • AussieDave

        July 22, 2009 at 9:04 pm

        I’m an Aussie journalist who produces a daily newsletter using InDesign. At home I use a G5 Power mac with Apple Cinema display – as backup or when on the road I use the earlier white MacBook 13-inch; it’s kinda cramped, but quite useable on the road and Australian carrier Telstra’s near-universal “Next G” 3G service gives great wireless broadband access in most places. At home I plug in a large-screen display (22-inch LG widescreen – cost abt 250 Aussie bucks) to the MacBook via VGA/mini DVI adaptor and find it every bit as good as my G5 desktop setup. Recently had a loaner MacBook Pro 15-incher attached to the big screen – even better. With the 17-incher, possibly I’d have no need for the extra big screen.

  21. Spank needed

    July 25, 2009 at 11:12 am

    Light computing : Web surfing, e-mail, Skype…

    Leisure : Looking some photos, a movie in Train, light games, true mobility (discrete in a coffe and others places)…

    =

    Compact and light Netbook 1 Kg and 8,9′(10′ maybe) and fanless

    More intensive labor like :

    Video Editing, photo correction, Web surfing and working, creative tasks with comfort

    =

    Notebook 13′ and more if necessary

    A simple evidence and no needs of a long jeremiad to understand that.

    What else ?

  22. Spank needed

    July 25, 2009 at 4:12 am

    Light computing : Web surfing, e-mail, Skype…

    Leisure : Looking some photos, a movie in Train, light games, true mobility (discrete in a coffe and others places)…

    =

    Compact and light Netbook 1 Kg and 8,9′(10′ maybe) and fanless

    More intensive labor like :

    Video Editing, photo correction, Web surfing and working, creative tasks with comfort

    =

    Notebook 13′ and more if necessary

    A simple evidence and no needs of a long jeremiad to understand that.

    What else ?

  23. Ozone

    July 25, 2009 at 12:51 pm

    I have to agree with the article, despite my love of gadgets. I’ve long since loved the idea of small, portable computers, and still have some old Windows CE clamshell devices. The problem was that they were just too small, or underpowered, or both. Admittedly, most of the time now all I need is email and internet access, and the occasional document editing capability, but how can you type on these small screens? I even picked up an Acer Aspire One… and returned it. Just too small, too noisy – what’s the point?

    When I’m at a conference or something, you want to be able to type comfortably or else what’s the point? Like TeasB, I settled on an MBAir. Even though I’m still searching for the “magic bullet” – a PDA sized computer that expands up to 13″ upon contact with air – Apple got it right: they reduced the size in the one dimension that makes the most sense.

  24. Ozone

    July 25, 2009 at 5:51 am

    I have to agree with the article, despite my love of gadgets. I’ve long since loved the idea of small, portable computers, and still have some old Windows CE clamshell devices. The problem was that they were just too small, or underpowered, or both. Admittedly, most of the time now all I need is email and internet access, and the occasional document editing capability, but how can you type on these small screens? I even picked up an Acer Aspire One… and returned it. Just too small, too noisy – what’s the point?

    When I’m at a conference or something, you want to be able to type comfortably or else what’s the point? Like TeasB, I settled on an MBAir. Even though I’m still searching for the “magic bullet” – a PDA sized computer that expands up to 13″ upon contact with air – Apple got it right: they reduced the size in the one dimension that makes the most sense.

  25. Spank needed

    July 25, 2009 at 11:05 pm

    NEWS :

    Sony

    and Panasonic

    are ready to launch movies on SD Card !!!

    All Netbooks are fitted with SD card reader

    One Mac is concerned by SD card reader inside….

  26. Spank needed

    July 25, 2009 at 4:05 pm

    NEWS :

    Sony

    and Panasonic

    are ready to launch movies on SD Card !!!

    All Netbooks are fitted with SD card reader

    One Mac is concerned by SD card reader inside….

  27. Mark

    July 27, 2009 at 6:22 pm

    Counterpoint:

    While the author’s experience sounds similar to mine, in that he has owned some of the same netbooks (I have an EEE 900, 1000HA and MSI Wind), his conclusions are the polar opposite of mine.

    I love my netbooks. My wife lovers her netbook.

    I have 16 other PCs in the house, ranging from powerhouse gaming desktops to web/SQL rackmount servers in the basement to an HTPC connected to the 56″ LCD HDTV, and I still spend more time on my MSI Wind for everything but gaming.

    Netbooks are the perfect companion to the moderm techno needs of the Twitter/Facebook/Messenger/email/surfing generation. To dismissively label them as “underpowered” means you were trying to do tasks with them than they were not designed to handle.

    In my 20+ years in IT, I would consider the introduction of the netbook formfactor as being as large milstone in PC history as the mouse and internet. It know that sounds like hyperbole, but I honestly feel this way. Never before have I been able to carry this much computing power, that last so long and weighs so little.

    Here’s a comparison: I rarely carry my huge SLR around with me and thus have missed out on the chance to take spontaneous pictures when the opportunity arises. But having purchased a little point-and-shoot that fits into my pocket, I now get way more pictures than ever before – even if the quality isn’t as high, at least I’m able to capture the memories that I would otherwise missed. In the same way, I never used to want to lug my laptops around with me, and was therefore unable to harness their power. With my netbook being so small and light, I have it with me almost all the time, and therefore have access to its capabilities at almost all times.

    I don’t look at my netbook as a PC replacement. I see it as a smartphone replacement. When compared in this light, the netbook advantage becomes more clear.

    • Anonymous

      September 10, 2009 at 9:10 am

      How’s this – I have a smartphone, netbook and desktop; my wife has a smartphone and a laptop; we run a general home media / backup server and a HTPC. And yet, we never really find that there are too many computers.

      I wouldn’t agree that a netbook is a smartphone replacement (when I’m out to dinner with friends, I’ve occasionally looked up things on the net and I certainly do not plan on carrying a netbook with me everywhere I go).

      What I WOULD agree with, is the horses for courses rationale that you’ve put forward – just because someone else has no need of a particular function, does not imply that it is the same for the rest of us. Good article, Mark.

  28. Mark

    July 27, 2009 at 11:22 am

    Counterpoint:

    While the author’s experience sounds similar to mine, in that he has owned some of the same netbooks (I have an EEE 900, 1000HA and MSI Wind), his conclusions are the polar opposite of mine.

    I love my netbooks. My wife lovers her netbook.

    I have 16 other PCs in the house, ranging from powerhouse gaming desktops to web/SQL rackmount servers in the basement to an HTPC connected to the 56″ LCD HDTV, and I still spend more time on my MSI Wind for everything but gaming.

    Netbooks are the perfect companion to the moderm techno needs of the Twitter/Facebook/Messenger/email/surfing generation. To dismissively label them as “underpowered” means you were trying to do tasks with them than they were not designed to handle.

    In my 20+ years in IT, I would consider the introduction of the netbook formfactor as being as large milstone in PC history as the mouse and internet. It know that sounds like hyperbole, but I honestly feel this way. Never before have I been able to carry this much computing power, that last so long and weighs so little.

    Here’s a comparison: I rarely carry my huge SLR around with me and thus have missed out on the chance to take spontaneous pictures when the opportunity arises. But having purchased a little point-and-shoot that fits into my pocket, I now get way more pictures than ever before – even if the quality isn’t as high, at least I’m able to capture the memories that I would otherwise missed. In the same way, I never used to want to lug my laptops around with me, and was therefore unable to harness their power. With my netbook being so small and light, I have it with me almost all the time, and therefore have access to its capabilities at almost all times.

    I don’t look at my netbook as a PC replacement. I see it as a smartphone replacement. When compared in this light, the netbook advantage becomes more clear.

    • Ray

      September 10, 2009 at 2:10 am

      How’s this – I have a smartphone, netbook and desktop; my wife has a smartphone and a laptop; we run a general home media / backup server and a HTPC. And yet, we never really find that there are too many computers.

      I wouldn’t agree that a netbook is a smartphone replacement (when I’m out to dinner with friends, I’ve occasionally looked up things on the net and I certainly do not plan on carrying a netbook with me everywhere I go).

      What I WOULD agree with, is the horses for courses rationale that you’ve put forward – just because someone else has no need of a particular function, does not imply that it is the same for the rest of us. Good article, Mark.

  29. Andreas

    July 30, 2009 at 1:59 pm

    Congrats on the new MBP, must say I’m envious. What you say about netbooks is more or less true, however two of thsoe complaints have been “fixed” with the new 11,6″ netbooks. The Aspire One D751h, for example, uses a 11,6″ screen with a 1366×768 resolution and a keyboard to fit (think its 98% or something).

  30. Andreas

    July 30, 2009 at 6:59 am

    Congrats on the new MBP, must say I’m envious. What you say about netbooks is more or less true, however two of thsoe complaints have been “fixed” with the new 11,6″ netbooks. The Aspire One D751h, for example, uses a 11,6″ screen with a 1366×768 resolution and a keyboard to fit (think its 98% or something).

  31. Michael

    August 6, 2009 at 9:36 am

    Well done review, especially because you tested it in a deeper way..

    What I’m interested in, is the battery.. Because with my MacBook Pro 15″ Mid 2007 I had no luck with batteries (2nd Battery is dead). My question to you, can this new battery hold the promise to provide so many cycles? I mean how many cycles do you have and how well is the battery health..

    Thx in advance

    Greets from Italy

    Michael

  32. Michael

    August 6, 2009 at 2:36 am

    Well done review, especially because you tested it in a deeper way..

    What I’m interested in, is the battery.. Because with my MacBook Pro 15″ Mid 2007 I had no luck with batteries (2nd Battery is dead). My question to you, can this new battery hold the promise to provide so many cycles? I mean how many cycles do you have and how well is the battery health..

    Thx in advance

    Greets from Italy

    Michael

  33. Apple

    August 20, 2009 at 6:14 pm

    So you plan to use this MacBook Pro for years to come? OR will upgrade to a new variant when its released in a few months?

  34. Apple

    August 20, 2009 at 11:14 am

    So you plan to use this MacBook Pro for years to come? OR will upgrade to a new variant when its released in a few months?

  35. becky

    August 31, 2009 at 2:49 am

    I have a 15″ mbp and I sorely wish they’d come out with the 13″ sooner. I really miss my 12″ powerbook. I do have some use for a netbook, actually, as I like to get out of the house and write. I just need something small and portable, with net access. No big programs, no fancy stuff. Just writing, and a browser.

    The new mbp looks sweet. I wish I could’ve gotten one, but my other one is just fine. Just heavy.

  36. becky

    August 30, 2009 at 7:49 pm

    I have a 15″ mbp and I sorely wish they’d come out with the 13″ sooner. I really miss my 12″ powerbook. I do have some use for a netbook, actually, as I like to get out of the house and write. I just need something small and portable, with net access. No big programs, no fancy stuff. Just writing, and a browser.

    The new mbp looks sweet. I wish I could’ve gotten one, but my other one is just fine. Just heavy.

  37. Lenita

    September 17, 2009 at 10:51 pm

    Thanks for the article. It was well thought out and full of vivid description. I have a question. What would you suggest for someone who spends about 50% of thier workday in the field (away from a computer) but needs a laptop to catch up on correspondences through e-mail, create documents, upload a few photo’s vibe on facebook and you know just spend a little down time? Would you suggest a netbook or a laptop? Thanks in advance!

  38. Lenita

    September 17, 2009 at 3:51 pm

    Thanks for the article. It was well thought out and full of vivid description. I have a question. What would you suggest for someone who spends about 50% of thier workday in the field (away from a computer) but needs a laptop to catch up on correspondences through e-mail, create documents, upload a few photo’s vibe on facebook and you know just spend a little down time? Would you suggest a netbook or a laptop? Thanks in advance!

  39. Enrique Bolanos

    October 4, 2009 at 9:49 pm

    I have had so much trouble with macs. I have owned an imac and two macbook pros. My imac needed a new hard drive after two years. My 1st macbook pro needed a new keyboard after two years. My 2nd macbook pro needed a new hard drive and a new display after 6 months. I’ve successfully converted most of my family to mac. My father had problems with his imac.

    Well, I’m finished with mac. NO MORE! I cannot justify spending so much money on an unreliable computer.

    • Y2K Blackout

      October 7, 2009 at 3:45 am

      Good for you.

      Get a PC with Windows 7 and you’ll never look back.

    • Ian HD

      October 16, 2009 at 3:25 pm

      Hey Enrique, just wanted to ask about when you needed to get a new keyboard for your macbook pro- I too have a macbook pro for two years and now need to replace the keyboard because of it freezing up. When you got yours replaced, did you have any other problems with it after that, or did it fix your problem?

  40. Enrique Bolanos

    October 4, 2009 at 2:49 pm

    I have had so much trouble with macs. I have owned an imac and two macbook pros. My imac needed a new hard drive after two years. My 1st macbook pro needed a new keyboard after two years. My 2nd macbook pro needed a new hard drive and a new display after 6 months. I’ve successfully converted most of my family to mac. My father had problems with his imac.

    Well, I’m finished with mac. NO MORE! I cannot justify spending so much money on an unreliable computer.

    • Y2K Blackout

      October 6, 2009 at 8:45 pm

      Good for you.

      Get a PC with Windows 7 and you’ll never look back.

    • Ian HD

      October 16, 2009 at 8:25 am

      Hey Enrique, just wanted to ask about when you needed to get a new keyboard for your macbook pro- I too have a macbook pro for two years and now need to replace the keyboard because of it freezing up. When you got yours replaced, did you have any other problems with it after that, or did it fix your problem?

  41. Henry

    October 16, 2009 at 8:08 am

    Awesome article, very insightful. Leaning towards a Mac myself. :P

    Congrats on the Mac purchase! Also big kudos for the continuation of school–masters program, noice!

  42. Henry

    October 16, 2009 at 1:08 am

    Awesome article, very insightful. Leaning towards a Mac myself. :P

    Congrats on the Mac purchase! Also big kudos for the continuation of school–masters program, noice!

  43. John

    October 17, 2009 at 5:14 am

    I’m the one who bought your MacBook on eBay in July (spellingace91), and am now looking to buy a MacBook Pro, and just happened upon this review. Very well-written review, with a lot of detail.

  44. John

    October 16, 2009 at 10:14 pm

    I’m the one who bought your MacBook on eBay in July (spellingace91), and am now looking to buy a MacBook Pro, and just happened upon this review. Very well-written review, with a lot of detail.

  45. Jake

    October 22, 2009 at 9:37 am

    Talking about the Macbook Pro “supporting up to 500GB”. That is false, in my opinion.

    In the Apple store they sell the configurations up to 500GB. But if you install a hard drive yourself that fits (2.5″ I think), then you can install any size.

  46. Jake

    October 22, 2009 at 2:37 am

    Talking about the Macbook Pro “supporting up to 500GB”. That is false, in my opinion.

    In the Apple store they sell the configurations up to 500GB. But if you install a hard drive yourself that fits (2.5″ I think), then you can install any size.

  47. Macbook Guy

    October 28, 2009 at 3:39 am

    I’m thinking of doing the same as you. I currently have two desktops, a notebook and a netbook. I really need to consolidate everything. I’m tired of going from one computer to the other just to find what I’m looking for. If only I could throw 2TB in my laptop…

  48. Macbook Guy

    October 27, 2009 at 8:39 pm

    I’m thinking of doing the same as you. I currently have two desktops, a notebook and a netbook. I really need to consolidate everything. I’m tired of going from one computer to the other just to find what I’m looking for. If only I could throw 2TB in my laptop…

  49. Chi

    November 4, 2009 at 6:25 am

    A 13″ Macbook Pro is the ideal compromise between an under powered netbook and a to large/heavy of a 15″ or larger notebook. With the 13″ Macbook Pro you don’t have to compromise in performance nor would it be too small to use or too heavy to carry arround. And you get style and real AL and glass materials instead of cheap plastic. Cheers to you all!

  50. Chi

    November 3, 2009 at 11:25 pm

    A 13″ Macbook Pro is the ideal compromise between an under powered netbook and a to large/heavy of a 15″ or larger notebook. With the 13″ Macbook Pro you don’t have to compromise in performance nor would it be too small to use or too heavy to carry arround. And you get style and real AL and glass materials instead of cheap plastic. Cheers to you all!

  51. Thinks Outside the Box

    November 4, 2009 at 4:05 pm

    I do like the design and the idea of having a clean looking laptop that looks like one solid thin block. Also, the multi-touch track pad sounds good. I own a Vaio type FW which looks a lot like a macbook from the inside except that it doesn’t have a multi-touch track pad. So I can install any version of Windows on a macbook pro with bootcamp right? That sounds good too as I am more familiar to a Windows environment compared to OS X. But of course, I would love to try getting familiar with OS X too because I want to see how true the statement ‘the most advanced OS yet’ goes. I have to admit, Vista does get slow and choppy sometimes but since I only own one laptop, I can’t really say whether it is the software that’s buggy or the hardware. Being a student, the pricetag on a macbook pro isn’t really what I would want to see unless it’s labelled ‘under $1000′. But as far as quality goes, I would say the price is worth it. Though I would read more reviews before even thinking of getting one. I’m quite satisfied with my current PC laptop despite the average user experience I am currently having with Vista. I was thinking of upgrading to Windows 7 but that’s a different story. Why don’t I just get a macbook pro 15″ and install Windows 7? Won’t that be easier? The only obstacle here is money. If I have $2000, a macbook pro is definitely going to be a new addition to my family of electronic devices.

  52. Thinks Outside the Box

    November 4, 2009 at 9:05 am

    I do like the design and the idea of having a clean looking laptop that looks like one solid thin block. Also, the multi-touch track pad sounds good. I own a Vaio type FW which looks a lot like a macbook from the inside except that it doesn’t have a multi-touch track pad. So I can install any version of Windows on a macbook pro with bootcamp right? That sounds good too as I am more familiar to a Windows environment compared to OS X. But of course, I would love to try getting familiar with OS X too because I want to see how true the statement ‘the most advanced OS yet’ goes. I have to admit, Vista does get slow and choppy sometimes but since I only own one laptop, I can’t really say whether it is the software that’s buggy or the hardware. Being a student, the pricetag on a macbook pro isn’t really what I would want to see unless it’s labelled ‘under $1000′. But as far as quality goes, I would say the price is worth it. Though I would read more reviews before even thinking of getting one. I’m quite satisfied with my current PC laptop despite the average user experience I am currently having with Vista. I was thinking of upgrading to Windows 7 but that’s a different story. Why don’t I just get a macbook pro 15″ and install Windows 7? Won’t that be easier? The only obstacle here is money. If I have $2000, a macbook pro is definitely going to be a new addition to my family of electronic devices.

  53. Yuriy

    November 8, 2009 at 8:16 pm

    Hi, a nice review!

    I think that SD card reader is one of the greatest upgrade in ports and features of new MacBook.

    On the old version of unibody Macbook used to rub out on the corners because of wearing bare just in the bag. Is it still like this?

    How about the heat when you use the keyboard of your laptop?

    Is it hard to accustom to the cold surface of the notebook while typing something for eg?

  54. Yuriy

    November 8, 2009 at 1:16 pm

    Hi, a nice review!

    I think that SD card reader is one of the greatest upgrade in ports and features of new MacBook.

    On the old version of unibody Macbook used to rub out on the corners because of wearing bare just in the bag. Is it still like this?

    How about the heat when you use the keyboard of your laptop?

    Is it hard to accustom to the cold surface of the notebook while typing something for eg?

  55. anonymous

    December 2, 2009 at 9:07 am

    I have been having a MacBook Pro for the last five weeks and am still not convinced. My hands are frozen, which makes typing a pain. At the end of the day my wrists and fingers are blue and I need a hot bath. I would not buy this item for several reasons and one of them is the freezing surface.

    • William Carr

      October 7, 2010 at 1:28 am

      Did you think abut wearing fingerless gloves?

      I thought you were kidding… the MacBook Pro puts out a persistent warmth.

  56. John

    December 4, 2009 at 10:54 am

    WIMP!

  57. gm

    December 14, 2009 at 3:54 pm

    Who needs a netbook when you can have an iphone? They do all of the stuff people want netbooks for. Web browsing, e-mail, light games, music. And it's even a cell phone. One less gadget to lug. My next laptop will be a macbook pro. My next netbook? The 4g iPhone.

  58. Richard

    December 15, 2009 at 12:01 am

    I am looking to buy a 15″ Macbook pro for my teenager. How much should I pay for a second hand notebook with 500 GB Hard drive? Thanks for your response

  59. anonymous

    December 15, 2009 at 1:57 am

    You're an idiot! It's not called a wimp but a woman and most of us have cold hands. Having said that, you've probably never seen one, which would explain why you wouldn't know.

  60. Anonymous

    December 15, 2009 at 2:02 am

    By the way, six weeks with a MacBook Pro and I can't be bothered to work on my Acer Win XP laptop. I've installed Win XP through VirtualBox on my Mac and it works perfectly. Games run smoothly, even CS4 which was slow in Vista, is very fast. I also work with a Wacom Intuos and the handwriting recognition software on the Mac is much better than Windows'. Can only recommend the MacBook Pro. I would never go back to Win.Anoynymous

  61. micro sd card 

    January 19, 2010 at 9:39 pm

    It's cheaper, faster, has more consumer-friendly features and now even has a 13-inch option for people who need slightly more portability. Those people who were waiting for the second-iteration version of a new hardware design (a pretty smart rule to follow with Apple products in general) before upgrading can safely do so now and get a better deal in the process.

  62. asdfsdfd

    February 2, 2010 at 10:03 am

    i really love this computer. i have the macbook pro, too
    question tho: i thot you said u sold all ur previous computers? how come u still have the macbook? lol
    but yeah good review.

  63. asdfasd

    February 2, 2010 at 10:05 am

    well the mbp also comes in 15 inch and 17 inch models :D

  64. essexmagician

    February 24, 2010 at 3:20 pm

    I agree…

    So far my macbook has been excellent…

  65. Anonymous

    February 24, 2010 at 11:25 pm

    I built the video for my site essex magician using my macbook. It is a superb program, which helps justify the price of the machine.

  66. Jess

    March 21, 2010 at 4:39 pm

    Recently my school got Apple's laptops and computers given to each student and throughout the school. All students got Macbooks and the computer labs got iMacs. I was a strict Dell only, PC gal. Growing up working in a computer software company, I always used PCs. I was reluctant to use the Macs, and found it frustrating to use the Macs.

    Now, I find it frustrating to use my mother's Dell. It annoys me when I can't use some things like finder and the layout button, things I used to hate. Since Mac's have such good features and specialized buttons and things it makes people confused or frustrated but now I'm in love.

    I may have no always been a Mac-girl but I was always an iPod girl, owning over 6 iPods throughout my life. One time I walked into a Apple store because both my iPod Touch and iPhone were broken. I was actually on a field-trip to city and I only had about 20 minutes to really fix them. They couldn't figure it out in 10 minutes, and I was just going to come back but instead they just replaced them. I was so relieved. I've never had that kind of service in my life.

    This experiences are why I'm purchasing my 17 inch MacBook Pro this March. I'm so excited. While it's not small like a netbook. I really need this big screen for studying to become a graphic desginer and visual effects artist. I just thought I'd share while I love Apple's products soo much. :D

  67. Jess

    March 21, 2010 at 11:39 pm

    Recently my school got Apple's laptops and computers given to each student and throughout the school. All students got Macbooks and the computer labs got iMacs. I was a strict Dell only, PC gal. Growing up working in a computer software company, I always used PCs. I was reluctant to use the Macs, and found it frustrating to use the Macs.

    Now, I find it frustrating to use my mother's Dell. It annoys me when I can't use some things like finder and the layout button, things I used to hate. Since Mac's have such good features and specialized buttons and things it makes people confused or frustrated but now I'm in love.

    I may have no always been a Mac-girl but I was always an iPod girl, owning over 6 iPods throughout my life. One time I walked into a Apple store because both my iPod Touch and iPhone were broken. I was actually on a field-trip to city and I only had about 20 minutes to really fix them. They couldn't figure it out in 10 minutes, and I was just going to come back but instead they just replaced them. I was so relieved. I've never had that kind of service in my life.

    This experiences are why I'm purchasing my 17 inch MacBook Pro this March. I'm so excited. While it's not small like a netbook. I really need this big screen for studying to become a graphic desginer and visual effects artist. I just thought I'd share while I love Apple's products soo much. :D

  68. Bill

    March 29, 2010 at 5:39 am

    not true about the netbook, I have had one for about 2 years now and it works perfectly!

  69. Bill

    March 29, 2010 at 5:53 am

    It depends on the netbook, some netbooks such as the HP mini that I have almost has a full size keyboard and it works just fine. I agree in the case of older acer aspire one model but I believe their newer model which has a 10 inch screen has a much more accessible keyboard as well.

  70. Magician Essex

    April 4, 2010 at 6:28 am

    Great Review, my unibody macbook is a few months old and is pretty good to be honest. I'm still getting used to a few of the “mac ways of doing things”. Overall though, pretty pleased…

  71. Rick Martin

    April 5, 2010 at 11:58 pm

    I enjoyed this article … mostly because I made a similar transition two years ago … first buying a Macbook and then last year purchasing a 15″ MBP. Since 1989 I have had 7 different PC laptops including a high priced M700 Tablet. When I started using the “Baby” Mac I was blown away by OSX. And that little two year old computer is still better than any PC I own. Both have Vista on Bootcamp / Fusion though I rarely use the PC side anymore. This 15″ MBP is worth every extra penny I paid for it … and you could not give me 3 PC's to replace it.

  72. GGGGGGGG

    April 9, 2010 at 3:37 am

    Wow, it worked for you–it clearly must not suck then! Get a grip, Vista sucks–average users admit it, Windows diehards admit it, even Bill himself admitted it.

    So who is the assclown?

  73. Gil

    April 9, 2010 at 3:52 pm

    lol stupid sucker, that's what you get for using an apple, fag.
    use a freaking windows netbook like everyone else that uses netbooks.
    here's what I use:
    I use an acer aspire AOD250
    I took out the harddrive, and replaced it with a 500 GB one.
    It originally had Windows 7 “starter” edition, which is microsoft giving you the middle finger basically, but with the harddrive change, I had to install a windows anyway, so I went with the classic XP Pro, after downloading the extra drivers windows won't otherwise find from the acer website.
    so, there's an intel atom processor, a 2 GB of ram, and a 500 GB of harddrive.

    I have yet to be disappointed with this netbook! Apple? oh yea, that's bull, their operating system is a resource whore, like windows vista (even has the same little icon in the corner). but windows? it's like it was MADE for this!!

    So don't you go complaining just because you go using gay apple netbooks and are disappointed.

  74. Newegg

    April 9, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    That's disgusting. You spent over a thousand dollars on a laptop, and you were only given 2gigs of RAM and 160 hard drive? At 5400rpm no less! That's idiotic.

  75. BC

    April 9, 2010 at 7:26 pm

    Seriously, the comparison between a macbook 13″ and a netbook isnt fair.

    Netbooks are supposed to be scaled down versions, pc's that are made for people who want a small computer, who dont need the power of a larger computer.

    And if your going to go for the larger computer (and still stay in the realm of laptops) I promise i can find a laptop that can blow the MacBook Pro out of the water.

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searcht

    (literally 5 minutes of searching)

    This review was written by a mac fanboy. its readily apparent in the way its constructed.

  76. AMaxwell

    April 10, 2010 at 6:10 am

    Gil,

    I would like to point out several flaws in your rant. First off, I do not feel that “stupid sucker” is a great way to start out a paragraph when making your point. The only thing that it accomplishes is making you look like an idiot or as you so eloquently put it a “stupid sucker”. Next off, Apple does not make netbooks. There are a wide variety of manufacturers that do; however, Apple is not one of them. Netbooks are a machines that operate on Windows only. I would hope you might know this, since you seem to take an interest in modifying them. I would I also like to point out that the author of this article was complaining that the Windows netbooks were lacking in their ability to meet the authors needs. I would strongly recommend paying attention to what you are reading before you critique another article. It makes you look like a dumb ass.

  77. bobby

    April 10, 2010 at 8:23 am

    hey pal, i am wondering how someone could close his eyes to the facts around or maybe he sees them but dont want to believe them… i mean whenever there are amazing PCs in every aspect like ASUS G73jh-A1 laptop which has this wonderful spec and price : (cpu (i7) , ram (8 Ghz 1333 ddr3) , GPU (gddr5 – ati 5870) , display … just for $1600 ) , why do you nominate this as an alternative laptop for many years? maybe you have made a correct decision to replace this one with your other netcraps which you own ;-)

  78. Adam Taylor Puckett

    April 15, 2010 at 10:38 pm

    I have the 13 in unibody MacBook as my first mac product purchased 13 months ago. I am now a Mac fanboy and will never go back to a PC. I have since bought a mac Mini and look forward to getting my wife a MacBook so she can get the great battery life. Her 17 in Dell had to have the battery replaced within 8-10 months and the second battery has died. She now has to plug it in to keep it charged… Not exactly a laptop experience. Hopefully learning the mac way wont be too frustrating for her… But I do love the 13 in macbook and their new 10 hour battery.

  79. Rick Martin

    April 16, 2010 at 12:44 am

    Once my wife started using a Mac …. she hates using the PC! PC guys just don't get it … they don't understand the user experience. Microsoft does not understand the user experience besides they don't make computers, they just make a clunky OS! Macs just work! Macs do what they are suppose to do without all of the drama! People who like PC's … like the drama! I liked the drama, until I bought a Mac … and now I like not having all of the drama! No one makes a PC that looks as good as a MacBook Pro, or is designed as well as a MacBook Pro, or works as well as a MacBook Pro!

  80. Cheryl

    April 16, 2010 at 8:47 pm

    I say let's all chip into a collection plate for Gil and ship a MacBook Pro to him. Once you've made the switch, there's no going back. Thank you, Apple, for a great experience.

  81. carol

    May 31, 2010 at 6:15 am

    Sorry for asking this question again. But I guess i asked my question on wrong post. Can we install Mac on window machine ?

  82. RicBic

    July 14, 2010 at 10:56 pm

    The two cheapest (save the fans) parts on a computer? Yeah, real sad. Considering most people wouldn't know how to fill up 80GB worth of hard drive space if someone showed them exactly what to stuff it with, and wouldn't ever be doing something intensive enough to justify more than 2GB of RAM, I wouldn't say that's idiotic. He spent a grand and got a powerful processor, an industry leading display, industry leading battery life, a mobo that supports 1066GHz RAM with faster buses than most any PC out there, a trackpad that doesn't suck, and an OS that is simple enough for the dumbest while deep enough for the smartest. He could spend another $100 and get a new HD and 4GB of 1066GHz RAM…big deal. I'd challenge you to find me a PC that is SPEC FOR SPEC, PART FOR PART TRULY as powerful for SIGNIFICANTLY cheaper. . . oh yeah, and one that doesn't come with one of the 3 crippled versions of Windows 7.

  83. magician essex

    August 3, 2010 at 6:39 am

    There's some serious Apple hate here…

  84. Forsaken

    August 6, 2010 at 3:11 pm

    Way to waste your money retard. Thats an outdated macbook you just blew your wad on. Now you can enjoy an expensive paperweight that you think makes you look cool, while in actuality everyone walking by you is laughing at your small e-penis.

    Netbook is 200-300$ and does 90% of what you are doing with ur far more expensive macbook pro. No way i would give up my netbook, or my powerhouse desktops at home for a underpowered 2GB ram(LOL) macbook pro. Your fanboism is off the charts in this article! Have fun with Photoshop/iPhoto and Brickbreaker!

  85. Xavier Lanier

    August 6, 2010 at 5:19 pm

    Um…you do realize this was published over a year ago…

  86. fun flash games

    October 5, 2011 at 11:21 am

    I do consider all the ideas you’ve introduced in your post. They’re really convincing and can definitely work. Nonetheless, the posts are very quick for newbies. Could you please extend them a bit from subsequent time? Thanks for the post.

  87. NotebookMaster

    November 10, 2011 at 10:15 am

    Ecxellent thing this MacBook.
    Few days ago I tried to repair this unique note…
    That was terribly hard, but I did it.

    First time repair – my first apple, great!

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